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Art and Design

At SHS we offer the Art & Design suite at A Level. This means that students work to their strengths and develop their work in their chosen discipline(s). The aim of the course is to enable our students to learn how to develop and produce personal, creative work within the context of Art & Design, across a broad range of creative disciplines. Project planning, target setting, negotiating and designing a project from conception to outcome all feature as essential elements of the creative process. Furthermore, the course enables students to analyse their own work as well as evaluate work by other artists, designers and craftspeople.

Specialisms available are: Fine Art, Photography and Textile Design

For You?

Art and Design requires the student to set their own agenda, rather than follow set topics. They have to make independent decisions all the way and be self-critical. They also need to be brave in expressing their ideas and accepting criticism as a positive force for change. Working in Art and Design makes students into good communicators and employers actively seek those who have studied the arts. You will be supported and guided on the route to becoming fully independent.

Course content

The first half-term is spent focusing on skills and workshops, to develop confidence and identify areas of strength and interest for the student.

COMPONENT 1: Personal Investigation

October 2022- December 2023

Centre set themes: Negotiated independent responses – Underpinned by trips and workshops to enhance learning

Students should produce a portfolio of practical work in response to a brief, scenario or stimulus, and a related written study of 1000-3000 words

Component 2: Externally set task

February 2024 – May 2024

Themes issued by OCR, each of which will have a range of written and visual starting points, briefs and stimuli.  Preparatory work completed during Spring Term ’24 culminating in 15 hour controlled-time to produce sophisticated outcome(s)

Exhibition in October 2024 – Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery

Assessment

COMPONENT 1: Personal Investigation

120 marks: 60% Non-exam assessment (internally assessed and externally moderated)

Component 2: Externally set task

80 marks: 40% Non-exam assessment (internally assessed and externally moderated)

A little more…

Art trips and workshops help to inform practical elements of the subject and we have our own graphics suite.

A Level students have their own dedicated studio space within the department.

For further information on the Art & Design Suite, visit the OCR website at www.ocr.org.uk

A Level Results 2021

A*/A = 100%

What do our students do next?

Recent A Level Artists have gone on to study degrees/MAs such as Architecture at Cambridge University, Graphic Design at Manchester University, Fine Art at Lancaster and Aberystwyth University, Art History at UCL and Foundation Diplomas in Art and Design at Hereford College of Art.

Recent Highlights:

We run an Annual Exhibition at Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery, where we display art by current SHS pupils, alongside former pupils who are now pursuing their careers in the Creative Industries.  Alumnae whose work was displayed in the event included Fine Artist Myfanwy Powell, Wedding Dress Designer Hannah Wilkins-Webb, Furniture Designer Wilma Wyatt, Illustrator Amy Rose, Woven Textiles artist Alice Timmis, Jewellery Designer Faye Barnfield, Theatre Director Jessica Edwards and Film Wardrobe Manager India Millar.

Head of Art & Creative Technologies Faculty:  Mr James Millichamp – j.millichamp@shr.gdst.net

Exam Board: OCR

Biology

Biology is about you! You will learn about how your body works, right down to the cellular and molecular level. The course will help you make sense of the world around you, including issues such as climate change, species extinction and antibiotic resistance. The revolution in molecular, cellular and gene technology will affect everybody on the planet and A Level Biology will provide an insight into these areas.

Special Entry Requirements: At least a 6 for either Single Award Biology or Dual Award Science. In the latter case a 7 would be desirable.

For you?

Biology is one of the most popular A Level subjects in the country, attracting students taking a wide range of other subjects. Many of these students enjoy the subject so much they eventually choose a biologically related degree course. Others go on to careers in law, computing, accounting or teaching. So, whatever field you will eventually work in, you will find biology a very rewarding and challenging course which will develop many of the skills essential for a successful career.

“You get to find out how things really work, far more than GCSE, which just scratches at the surface”

Course content

Year 1
1. Biological molecules
2. Cells
3. Organisms exchange substances with their environment
4. Genetic information, variation and relationships between organisms

Year 2
5. Energy transfers in and between organisms
6. Organisms respond to changes in their internal and external environments
7. Genetics, populations, evolution and ecosystems
8. The control of gene expression

Coursework

No Coursework, but you must complete 12 set practical activities across the two year A-level course. Teaching staff will monitor and assess practical competencies in lessons, leading to a Practical Competence Pass / Fail  recorded on your examination certificate alongside your final grade.

Assessment

Practical competence will not contribute towards the final grade, but practical-based questions will form about 15% of the total assessment on the written papers. You will have many opportunities to learn and use practical skills to link theory with practice, deepening your knowledge and understanding. These practicals will be integrated into day to day teaching. 10% of biology exams will assess mathematical skills at higher tier GCSE level.

Paper 1: Any content from topics 1 – 4, including relevant practical skills

• 2 hours written exam (90 marks – 33.3% of A Level)
• 75 marks: a mixture of short and long answer questions
• 15 marks: extended response questions

Paper 2: Any content from topics 5 – 8, including relevant practical skills

• 2 hours written exam (90 marks –  33.3% of A Level)
• 75 marks: a mixture of short and long answer questions
• 15 marks: Comprehension question

Paper 3: Any content from topics 1 – 8, including relevant practical skills

• 2 hours written exam (80 marks – 33.3% of A Level)
• 55 marks: structured questions, including practical techniques and critical analysis of given experimental data
• 25 marks: one essay from a choice of two titles

a little more…

All A Level Biologists attend a 2 day marine biology residential field course at Aberystwyth. We spend each day on the shoreline carrying out ecological investigations. This is supplemented by 2 full days at local habitats studying moorland management and freshwater ecology.

For a full appreciation of the course content please visit the AQA website at www.aqa.org.uk.

A Level Results 2021

A*/A = 67%

Head of Science Faculty and Department: Mrs Maria Harding – m.harding@shr.gdst.net

Exam Board: AQA

 

Business Studies

Business is a subject that considers what is happening now in the world; it is relevant to us all.  It is a versatile subject that is useful in any future career.  Everything we study is relevant, from your own spending decisions to business and multinationals which provide the products we buy; from a government that taxes us and provides education and healthcare to a range of international topics.

For you?

Are you interested in working within a domestic or international business setting?  Studying Business A level will provide you with a holistic understanding of business across a range of settings.  This course is dynamic in nature as current business practices and situations will be researched and evaluated. Students apply their knowledge and understanding to real-life business contexts, using real business case studies in all our assessments.

Course Content

Theme 1: Marketing and People

  • meeting customer needs
  • the market
  • marketing mix and strategy
  • managing people
  • entrepreneurs and leaders

Theme 2:  Managing Business Activities and People

  • raising finance
  • financial planning
  • managing finance
  • resource management
  • external influences

Theme 3: Business decisions and strategy

  • business objectives and strategy
  • business growth
  • decision-making techniques
  • influences on business decisions
  • assessing competitiveness
  • managing change

Theme 4:  Global business

  • globalisation
  • global markets and business expansion
  • global marketing
  • global industries and companies (multinational corporations)

Assessment

Paper 1:  Marketing, people and global business (themes 1 and 4)

Written exam, 2 hours long.  100 marks, 35% of A-Level

Paper 2:  Business activities, decisions and strategy (themes 2 & 3)

Written exam, 2 hours long, 100 marks, 35% of A-Level

Paper 3: Investigating business in a competitive environment (all themes)

Written exam, 2 hours long, 100 marks, 30% of A-Level

Progression

Students will develop transferable skills that support higher education and the transition to employment, including numeracy, communication, an understanding of the business environment and commercial awareness.  Students can progress from this qualification to higher education courses such as business management, business administration, accountancy and finance, human resource management, marketing, retail management, tourism management and international business.  Business Studies allows access to a wide range of careers ranging from banking, sales, product management and general management to working in public sector organisations or charities.

Head of Department: Mrs Marion Rumble – m.rumble@shr.gdst.net

Exam Board: Edexcel

Chemistry

Chemistry is a great choice of subject for people who want a career in health and clinical professions, such as medicine, nursing, biochemistry, dentistry or forensic science. It will also equip you for a career in industry, for example in the petrochemical or pharmaceutical industries.

Special Entry Requirements: Pupils must have a grade 6 or above in Chemistry or Double Award Science at GCSE to enter onto the A Level course.  A good grade in Mathematics is also advisable.

For you?

If you enjoyed Chemistry at GCSE, you’ll love this A Level course. In two years you will get a real in-depth knowledge of this fascinating subject, preparing you for further education or giving you the credentials to enhance your job options straight away. Chemists have greatly improved the quality of life for the majority of people. Our A Level course is underpinned by practical skills.   You also find out how chemists innovate, designing solutions to the problems that affect modern life.

Course content

Year 1

  • Physical chemistry
    • Including atomic structure, amount of substance, bonding, energetics, kinetics, chemical equilibria, Le Chatelier’s principle and redox reactions.
  • Inorganic chemistry
    • Including periodicity, Group 2 the alkaline earth metals, Group 7(17) the halogens.
  • Organic chemistry
    • Including introduction to organic chemistry, alkanes, halogenoalkanes, alkenes, alcohols, organic analysis.

Year 2

  • Physical chemistry
    • Including thermodynamics, rate equations, equilibrium constant (Kc) for homogeneous systems, electrode potentials and electrochemical cells.
  • Inorganic chemistry
    • Including properties of Period 3 elements and their oxides, transition metals, reactions of ions in aqueous solution.
  • Organic chemistry
    • Including optical isomerism, aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids and derivatives, aromatic chemistry, amines, polymers, amino acids, proteins and DNA, organic synthesis, NMR spectroscopy, chromatography

Assessment

Practical competence does not contribute towards the final grade, but practical-based questions will form about 15% of the total assessment on the written papers.  you will have many opportunities to learn and use practical skills to link theory with practice, deepening your knowledge and understanding.  These practical lessons will be integrated into day to day teaching.  10% of chemistry exams will assess mathematical skills at higher tier GCSE level.

Paper 1:

• Inorganic Chemistry with relevant physical chemistry and practical skills
• 2 hours (35% of A Level)

Paper 2:

• Organic chemistry with relevant physical chemistry and practical skills
• 2 hours (35% of A Level)

Paper 3:

• All practical skills and all content
• 2 hours (30% of A Level)

A Level Results 2021

A*/A = 64%

What do our students do next?

2021 cohort students have gone on to study a wide range of subjects including Veterinary Medicine, Psychology, Forensic Science, Theoretical Physics, and Chemistry with Management.

Head of Department: Mrs Claire Tinney – c.tinney@shr.gdst.net

Exam Board: AQA

Classical Civilisation

Classical Civilisation is one of the most wide-ranging subjects you can find. You have the chance to study literature, geography, ideas of heroism, architecture, plays and religion and to discuss some of the most fundamental ideas and concepts ever contemplated.

Special Entry Requirements: We normally expect A Level students to have gained a 6 in English Language or Literature at GCSE level.  Exceptions may be made in particular circumstances.

For you?

As with all A Level subjects, the more you put in, the more you get out, but the plays and stories you study at this level are still fearsomely relevant to us today and raise many philosophical and moral questions, as well as being lively and amusing good reads! All the books, plays and texts that you study will be in English and you do not need to have studied Latin or Classical Civilisation at GCSE to excel in this course.  All you need is a mind open to new ideas and a willingness to think.  You will be looking at the birth of western civilisation, through the epic poetry and plays of the Greeks and through their ideas about religion.  Students find that Classical Civilisation complements topics they study in English, Politics, Religious Studies, Psychology, Drama and the sciences.  Wherever you look, the Greeks were there first and it is fascinating to see students making the connections as they progress through the course.

Course content and Assessment

You will be studying three main topics in Classical Civilisation and all topics are in English:

  • the epic poems of Homer and Virgil (Odyssey and Aeneid), where we find that topics such as the nature of heroism, PTSD, when and where to use deceit to get what you want, perseverance, loyalty, duty, what it means to be a refugee, propaganda and the human need for a home.
  • the place of religion in the human psyche and how and why people worship gods.
  • the origins of theatre and the different role that theatre had for the ancients.

Assessment is by three externally assessed examinations at the end of the course.

The World of the Hero H408/11:
In this module you will be studying Homer’s Odyssey, the story of Odysseus’ ten year voyage from Troy to Ithaca and the adventures he has on the way.  We shall be looking at the nature of heroism, how Odysseus related to the various people, both mortal and immortal, male and female, friendly and unfriendly that he met on that journey.  We shall also be studying Virgil’s Aeneid, which is essentially the Roman version of Homer’s Trojan story.  In the Aeneid we follow Aeneas as he escapes from the destruction of Troy and travels across the Mediterranean sea meeting some of the same people that Odysseus did, but dealing with them differently.  We see him gradually realise what his destiny is and make the hard decisions which lead him to being accepted in his new homeland – Italy.  This is the foundation myth of the Roman race and it is seething with propaganda for the rule of the first emperor, Augustus.

Greek Theatre H408/21
In this module we go back to the birth of theatre in the ancient world and study three plays – Oedipus The King, Bacchae and Frogs. The first two are tragedies which through the downfall of rulers of their city show us how we should live, interact with our fellow citizens and how we should respect the power of fate and the gods. Conversations can get quite heated in lessons when we are discussing these plays showing that they are as relevant now as they were then dealing as they do, with the big issues of humanity and which nicely complement work students may be doing in Psychology. The Frogs, our comedy, shows us just how rumbustious the ancient world could be, but also makes us consider how we, as citizens, should behave in the face of a common threat. There is singing and dancing, some dutious humour and lots of fun in Greek comedy but there is also a serious message and students are quick to see the importance of the message in all the laughter.

Greek Religion H408/31
In this module you will be studying how, why and where the Greeks worshipped their gods. Everyone knows something about the Greek gods; Zeus, Apollo, Athena, Poseidon are all familiar from the Percy Jackson films and lots more, but in this module you will find out exactly how these deities fitted into ancient life and what the philosophy behind them was. This module meshes very nicely with the philosophy element of Religious Studies as well as with the Theatre module, which was also a celebration of Dionysus. Religion was part of everyday life for the Greeks and it brought communities together. There are elements that we might not recognise as religions and you will be made to think a little more deeply about what it means to be part of a community and have common experiences.

A little more…

Everything you study will be in English, no prior knowledge of Latin (or Greek) is required to succeed at Classical Civilisation. The beauty of this subject is its connections with almost every aspect of life—art, literature, science, politics, history, religion and much more.  We try to give our students a wide range of experience of the Classical World, including seeing as much Greek drama as we can, visiting the British Museum, welcoming outside speakers and if possible arranging a trip to Greece to see the places you are studying.  This is a well-regarded and dynamic subject which forces us all to look at ourselves from a different angle.  If you study Classics you will never look at the world with the same eyes again!

A Level Results 2021

A-B = 100%

What can I do with Classical Civilisation?

What can’t you do?  This is broad-ranging subject which touches on all aspects of human life and gives students a range of knowledge and examples of how to approach problems.  It is essay-based with sources such as texts, vases, and archaeological sites to assess and the skills acquired in doing this are much in demand.  The art of acquiring information from an artefact is invaluable in professions such as forensics and journalism and a grounding in the ancient world will give you a window onto our own.   We have had former pupils who have gone on to be architects, solicitors, journalists, doctors, teachers, actors and publishers, as well as marine biologists and environmentalists.   It is the skills and the understanding that this subject gives as well as the intrinsically interesting subject matter that makes this such a great course.

Head of Department:  Mrs Di Birt – d.birt@shr.gdst.net

Exam Board:  OCR

Computer Science

Computers are widely used in all aspects of business, industry, government, education, leisure and the home. In this increasingly technological age, a study of computer science, and particularly how computers are used in the solution of a variety of problems, is not only valuable to the learners themselves but also essential to the future well-being of the country.

Computer science integrates well with subjects across the curriculum. It demands both logical discipline and imaginative creativity in the selection and design of algorithms and the writing, testing and debugging of programs; it relies on an understanding of the rules of language at a fundamental level; it encourages an awareness of the management and organisation of computer systems; it extends the learners’ horizons beyond the school or college environment in the appreciation of the effects of computer science on society and individuals. For these reasons, computer science is as relevant to a learner studying arts subjects as it is to one studying science subjects.

For you?

Four reasons to study Computer Science:

  1. The digital age needs computer scientists.
    Like it or not, you’re living in it – this is the Digital Age. Computer programmes have all but infiltrated every aspect of our lives. Computer scientists theorise, design, develop and apply the software and hardware for the programmes we use day in day out – sounds pretty important to us.
  2. Computer science students have excellent graduate prospects.
    Computer Science students stand a pretty good chance of being professionally employed, or in further study, within six months of leaving uni. And that chance is strengthened if you go to one of the UK’s best universities for the subject.
  3. Computer scientists earn big bucks.
    Computer scientists are in demand and their salaries reflects this. Recent graduates in professional roles earn quite a lot on average – Computer Science graduates earn above the average UK wage!
  4. Computer scientists are needed in every type of industry.
    Every industry uses computers so naturally computer scientists can work in any. Problems in science, engineering, health care, and so many other areas can be solved by computers. It’s up to the computer scientist to figure out how, and design the software to apply the solution.

Course content and Assessment:

Component 1: Computer Systems

Assessment:   Written Examination 2 hours 30 minutes, 140 marks, worth 40%

Subject Content:

  • Components of a computer and their uses.
  • Types of software and the different methodologies used to develop software.
  • How data is exchanged between different systems.
  • How data is represented and stored within different structures.
  • Legal, moral, cultural and ethical issues.

Component 2: Computational thinking, algorithms and programming

Assessment:  Written Examination 2 hours 30 minutes, 140 marks, worth 40%

Subject Content:

  • Elements of computational thinking
  • Problem solving and programming
  • The use of the algorithms to describe problems and standard algorithms.

Component 3: Practical programming experience

Assessment:  Marked by your teacher and moderated by OCR, 70 marks, worth 20%

Subject Content:

A practical programming project of your choice where you:

  1. Analyse the system requirements
  2. Design an appropriate solution
  3. Develop the solution
  4. Evaluate the solution

Common Destinations for Computer Science students include:

Degrees in Computer Science related subjects: Computer Science | Networking | Software Development | Business Analysis |Systems Engineering | Cyber Security

Work placed destinations include roles such as: Web Developer | Mobile Application Developer | Systems Engineers | Business Analysts | IT Managers Systems Architects | Machine Learning Engineers | Computer Games Designers |Network Architects | Cyber Security Specialists | Forensic Criminologists

A number of our recent 2020 leavers have gone on to study related subjects at university or into degree level apprenticeships with companies such as Dyson.

A Level Results 2021

A*/A = 100%

Head of Department: Mr Andrew Petford – a.petford@shr.gdst.net

Exam Board: OCR – H446

Design and Technology: Product Design

This creative and thought-provoking qualification gives students the practical skills, theoretical knowledge, and confidence to succeed in a number of careers. Especially those in the creative industries.  They will investigate historical, social, cultural, environmental, and economic influences on design and technology, whilst enjoying opportunities to put their learning in to practice by producing prototypes of their choice.  Students will gain a real understanding of what it means to be a designer, alongside the knowledge and skills sought by higher education and employers.

Special Entry Requirements: A grade 6 or above at GCSE in Design and Technology, and other subjects such as Business Studies,
Computer Science and Art & Design.  Exceptions may be made in special circumstances.

For you?

If you have a practical flare and interest in Product Design this A-level course offers you the opportunity to further develop your knowledge working independently to gain a range of practical skills alongside the theoretical elements needed for a career in the Design Industry. Drawing on previous skills from computer science, business studies, art and design students will engage in both practical and theoretical study enabling them to progress to further education and career opportunities including Architecture, Product Design, Manufacturing, Interior Designer, Furniture Designer, Engineer and many more.

Subject Co-ordinator Design and Technology & Food, Preparation and Nutrition:
Mrs Julia Viani j.viani@shr.gdst.net
Exam Board: AQA

Drama & Theatre Studies

Drama and Theatre is a fascinating subject providing the opportunity to explore a wide variety of plays, practitioners, thematic topics and artistic choices. Whatever your future ambitions might be, drama offers the chance to explore a rich variety of cultural and political creative works while honing your ability to communicate effectively, collaborate, think outside the box and express yourself. It is a well respected academic subject which explores both practical skills in drama and theoretical approaches to theatre analysis.

Special Entry Requirements: Ideally, Grade 7 or above at GCSE Drama, English Literature or English Language, but this is not always essential.  However, a deep and genuine interest in drama and theatre on both a practical and academic level is vital.

For you?

If you have a genuine interest in creativity, drama research, topical issues and developing original and scripted performance work then you will gain a great deal from this course.  You must be a committed creative, willing to explore practically the demands of the course, alongside collaborating with your peers.  Although Drama and Theatre is a demanding subject with rigorous written elements in all components, it is also a highly rewarding one that supports many other subjects studied at A level.  Pupils who study drama can follow a multitude of paths, whether these be psychology, law or joining the performing arts industry.

Course content and Assessment

The two-year course is made up of three components:

Component 1: Drama and Theatre

  • Knowledge and understanding of drama and theatre
  • Study of 2 set plays – analysis and evaluation of the work of live theatre makers.
  • Written exam: 3 hours – open book – 80 marks – worth 40%

Component 2 Creating Original Drama (practical)

  • Process of creating devised drama
  • Performance of devised drama (students may contribute as performer, designer or director)
  • Devised piece must be influenced by the work and methodologies of one prescribed practitioner
  • Assessed by working notebook and devised performance – 60 marks – worth 30%
  • Marked by teachers and moderated by AQA

Component 3 Making Theatre

  • Practical exploration and interpretation of three extracts (Extract 1, 2 and 3) each taken from a different play.
  • Methodology of a prescribed practitioner must be applied to Extract 3.  Extract 3 is to be performed as a final assessed piece (students may contribute as performer, designer or director)
  • Reflective report analysing and evaluating theatrical interpretation of all three extracts
  • Assessed by performance of Extract 3 and a reflective report – 60 marks – worth 30%
  • Marked by AQA

A little more…

Drama and Theatre is a universal subject which will improve not only your understanding of drama methodologies, but also your inter-personal skills and self-confidence.  It will enable you to develop your leadership qualities and analysis of the world in which we live, what challenges us and how we may overcome modern day social issues.  All areas that will maximise your potential and future success for university and the world of work.

What do our students do next?

Students study Drama and Theatre with subjects such as Psychology, Politics, Economics, English and Languages.  Many go on to study drama, English, History, Law and other subjects at undergraduate level.  Some go directly to specialised drama schools or colleges to study acting or performance as a career choice.

Recent Highlights

Pupils who study A level have the opportunity to become subject mentors for drama.  This would lead to numerous opportunities in directing, leadership and creating performance work.  Current pupils have directed lower years in productions and acted in several pieces throughout the year, including the whole school production, Birmingham Rep Satellite Theatre and the SHS Arts Festival.  A-Level Drama and Theatre students are actively encouraged to participate in all creative events throughout the academic year, offering vocational opportunities to those with the ambition for a possible career in the arts sector.

Head of Department:  Paula Tombs – p.tombs@shr.gdst.net

Exam Board:  AQA

Economics

Economics is a subject that considers what is happening now in the world and therefore relevant to us
all. It is a subject to which everyone can bring some personal experiences and is a versatile subject that
is useful to any future career.

Special Entry Requirements:  There are no special subject requirements, but you should be comfortable with handling numbers.  Mathematics GCSE grade 6 is useful.

For you?

If you have an enquiring mind, a critical and thoughtful approach to your studies, Economics could be for you. Have you ever wondered why external factors have had such an impact on our society and societies across the world?  Why is there reportedly a supply chain crisis? Why has this had an impact on prices and what can be done about it?  If you want to find answers and critically evaluate the solutions, look no further.

Course content

The Economics A level is structured into four themes and consists of three externally examined papers.  Students build knowledge and understanding of core economic models and concepts in Themes 1 and 2, and then build on this and apply their knowledge to more complex concepts and models in Themes 3 and 4.  Students will need to apply their knowledge and understanding to both familiar and unfamiliar contexts in the assessments and demonstrate an awareness of current economic events and policies.

Theme 1: Introduction to markets and market failure

  • Nature of economics
  • how markets work
  • market failure
  • government intervention

Theme 2:  The UK Economy – performance and policies

  • measures of economic performance
  • aggregate supply and demand
  • national income
  • economic growth
  • macroeconomic objectives and policy

Theme 3: Business behaviour and the labour market

  • business growth
  • business objectives
  • revenues, costs and profits
  • market failure
  • government intervention

Theme 4:  A Global Perspective

  • international economics
  • poverty and inequality
  • emerging and developing economies
  • the financial sector
  • role of the state in the macroeconomy

Assessment

Paper 1:  Marketing, people and global business (themes 1 and 2)

Written exam, 2 hours long.  100 marks, 35% of A-Level

Paper 2:  The National and Global Economy (themes 2 & 4)

Written exam, 2 hours long, 100 marks, 35% of A-Level

Paper 3: Investigating business in a competitive environment (all themes)

Written exam, 2 hours long, 100 marks, 30% of A-Level

A little more…

Economics and Business combines well with both Arts and the Sciences to provide breadth. The Library is well stocked with texts and journals as it is very important that students take an interest in domestic and global news to put topics into context.  For further information on the syllabus, visit the Edexcel website at www.edexcel.com

Progression

Students will develop transferable skills that support study in a wide range of subjects at university and the transition to employment, including quantitative and analytical analysis, forming and testing hypotheses, and commercial awareness.  The development and application of quantitative skills prepare students for study of economics and related courses at university.  Students can progress from this qualification to higher education courses such as economics degrees with a focus on theory, or degrees in applied economics such as environmental economics, labour economics, public sector economics or monetary economics.  Alternatively, students may choose to study a business economics, mathematical economics or business degree.  Economics allows access to a wide range of careers ranging
from finance, banking, insurance, accountancy, management and consultancy, to becoming professional economists.

Head of Department: Mrs Marion Rumble – m.rumble@shr.gdst.net

Exam Board:  Edexcel

English Literature

English is a subject that involves the intellect, the imagination and the emotions. It develops skills of analysis and empathy that can be applied in a variety of situations and which are much valued by universities and employers. It encourages the close reading of texts and the ability to articulate ideas both orally and in writing. It will give you an insight into human behaviour and extend your linguistic horizons.

Special Entry Requirements: We normally expect A-Level students to have gained at least a 6 for English Literature at GCSE.  Exceptions may be made in particular circumstances.

For you?

A commitment to reading is important;  not just your set texts, but wider examples of literature, texts from a common genre, background material  and criticism.  In addition, you should be prepared to take an active part in class discussions as it is often through sharing opinions and ideas that you discover what you really think.

Course Content

Year 1

The course begins with a brief induction programme designed to establish some of the key skills required at A-level.

In Year 1 we will follow a unit on ‘Crime Fiction’, including study of Brighton Rock (Greene), When Will There Be Good News? (Kate Atkinson) and The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (Coleridge).  We will also study a collection of poetry in preparation for a coursework assignment which require you to set and answer your own thesis.

Year 2

Year 2 involves study of ‘Comedy’, including The Taming of the Shrew (Shakespeare), The Importance of being Earnest (Oscar Wilde) and The Nun’s Priest’s Tale (Chaucer).   Alongside examination preparation, you will also develop a coursework assignment focusing on a prose text of your own choice.

Assessment

Examination unit: Literary genres:
Comedy (2 hours 30 minutes – Written paper – 40% of A Level)
You will study three texts, including a play by Shakespeare, a second play and one text written before 1900.

Examination unit: Texts and genres:
Crime writing (3 hours – Written paper – 40% of A Level)
You will study three texts, including a novel published after 2000, a collection or extended work of poetry and a
further text written before 1900.

Coursework unit: Theory and Independence
(20% of A Level – two essays of approx. 1500 words)
You will choose one poetry and one prose text to read and study, before writing a critical response incorporating your
understanding of a range of critical and literary theory.

A little more…

We have a termly literary magazine – ‘Scribble’ – which all girls studying English Literature are encouraged to contribute to; this is an opportunity to indulge your passions for reading and literature you enjoy.  Where possible, we also try to attend live performances of our set texts at the theatre or cinema.

For further information on the syllabus visit the AQA website at www.aqa.org and search for English Literature B.

A Level Results 2021

A* = 60%

A*-B = 100%

What do our students do next?
In recent years, a high number of girls taking English Literature have applied to Oxford, Cambridge and red-brick universities; we have girls each year choosing to continue studying English Literature at universities including Durham, Exeter, UCL, Sheffield and Southampton.  More widely, girls who have taken English Literature have applied successfully to study Law, Journalism, Medicine, Real Estate and modern foreign languages.  English Literature is a very favourable subject to have as part of any University application, as it is always high on a university’s list of facilitating subjects.

Recent Highlights:
Sixth Former Lily Harding achieved an A* and has gone on to read English Literature (joint honours) at the University
of Edinburgh.  Three A-level students achieved full marks on their coursework submission in 2021.  Our English prefects have taken our literary magazine, ‘Scribble’, to new strengths this year with both Feminism and Zeitgeist special editions.

Head of English Faculty:  Mr Robin Aldridge – r.aldridge@shr.gdst.net

Exam Board: AQA

Fine Art

In the Art department, we offer Fine Art and Textile Design as separate A Levels.  The aim of the course is to enable our students to learn how to develop and produce personal, creative work within an art and design context, across a broad range of creative disciplines. Furthermore, the course aims to enable students to analyse their own visual work as well as evaluate and learn from work by other artists, designers and crafts people.

Special Entry Requirements: Grade 6 or above at GCSE.  Exceptions may be made in particular circumstances.

For you?

Yes, provided you embrace the experimentation of media and progression from GCSE.  Great emphasis is put upon developing the creative and expressive content of your own artwork as the course proceeds.  Sketchbooks and Journals are used to underpin all work.  They will contain observational studies plus ideas developing from historical and contextual material as well as those that sometimes relate to gallery visits.  Most of the work for this syllabus is practical or studio based, so that students can develop their abilities of observation and analysis of the visual world, sensitivity, skill, personal expression and imagination.

Course Content

The A Level is a taught, structured techniques and processes based course.  During the first year, emphasis is put on introducing students to new materials, techniques and different approaches to the subject.  Relating the work to that of professional artists and developing it through extended research will help you to achieve a successful outcome to any project.  During the second year, the students continue to refine their work demonstrating increased confidence in approach.

Assessment

One coursework portfolio and one examination unit.

A little more….

Art trips/workshops help to inform both the coursework and examination elements of the subject.  There have been recent visits to Paris and New York Art Galleries/Museums.  A successful portrait workshop run by the National Portrait Gallery BP prize winner Peter Edwards recently instigated some beautiful work.  The year 13 Art students have their own studio space within the art department.  For further information on the Art syllabus visit the Edexcel website at www.edexcel.com.

What do our students do next?

Recent A Level Artists have gone on to study degrees/MAs such as Architecture at Cambridge University, Graphic Design at Manchester University, Fine Art at Lancaster and Aberystwyth University, Art History at UCL and Foundation Diplomas in Art and Design at Hereford College of Art.

A-Level Results

A*-A = 100%

Head of Creative Arts and Technologies Faculty: Mr James Millichamp – j.millichamp@shr.gdst.net

Exam Board: Edexcel

Food Science and Nutrition - Level 3 Applied Diploma

The WJEC Level 3 Applied Diploma in Food Science and Nutrition gives students the necessary knowledge and creative flare for careers across many industries including nutritionists, catering and hospitality, recipe development, food manufacturers and government agencies. Students will develop an understanding of menu development, food products and policies that support healthy eating initiatives creating many opportunities within the field of food science and nutrition. This applied qualification has been designed to support students wishing to pursue further education at university level.

Special Entry Requirements: A grade 6 or above at GCSE in any Food Preparation and Nutrition, Hospitality and Catering, Physical
Education, Biology and Design and Technology subjects. Exceptions may be made in special circumstances.

For you?

If you have a practical flare and interest in Food Science and Nutrition this Level 3 course offers you the opportunity to further develop your knowledge working independently to gain a range of practical skills alongside the theoretical elements needed for a career in the food industry.

Course Content

Students complete three units: two mandatory and one optional.

The first mandatory unit will enable students to demonstrate an understanding of the science of food safety, nutrition, and nutritional needs in a wide range of contexts, and through on–going practical sessions, to gain practical skills to produce quality food items to meet the needs of individuals.

The second mandatory unit will allow students to develop their understanding of the science of food safety and hygiene; essential knowledge for anyone involved in food production in the home or wishing to work in the food industry. Practical sessions will support the gaining of theoretical knowledge and ensure learning is a tactile experience.

Studying one of the two optional units will allow learners the opportunity to study subjects of particular interest or relevance to them, building on previous learning and experiences.

Subject Co-Ordinator: Mrs Julia Viani, j.viani@shr.gdst.net

Exam Board: WJEC

French

Studying French post-GCSE will give you a highly marketable skill and open possibilities to work and travel in Europe and the world. French is one of the official languages of the United Nations. It is spoken as an official language in 33 countries on five continents and is the second language of the Internet. Despite Brexit, our close proximity to France and our longstanding links with the country mean that our relationship with France is destined to continue to be strong.

Special Entry Requirements:  At least grade 6 in GCSE

For you?

Past pupils have enjoyed studying a wide range of topics from contemporary issues to historical events, and you will have the opportunity to study French literature.

You will improve practical language skills and learn more about the society and culture of France and the French-speaking world.

The gap between GCSE and A level is not as wide as you might think and you will build on the good basis of grammar and vocabulary you have already acquired to reach a high level of competency in both written and spoken French.

The emphasis in lessons is on participation and discussion in addition to theoretical study.  Once a week you will have a conversation class with the French assistant in a small group, which will be invaluable in increasing the confidence and fluency of your spoken French.  In addition, you will watch French films, read magazines and newspapers and have the chance to visit France, too.

Course content

Two themes are prescribed by AQA for the course:

• Social issues and trends – the changing nature of family, the ‘cyber-society’, the place of voluntary work, positive features of a diverse society, life for the marginalised the the treatment of criminals.
• Political, intellectual and artistic culture – a culture proud of its heritage, contemporary francophone music, cinema: the 7th art form, teenagers, the right to vote and political commitment, demonstrations, strikes, politics and immigration.

You will also study a film and a short novel.

Assessment

There are three exams for A level French:

Paper 1 – Listening, Reading and Writing (2 hours 30 minutes – 40% of A level grade)

4 sections:

• Listening comprehension (you have your own MP3 player and can control the playback of the recording)
• Reading comprehension
• Translation into English
• Translation into French

Paper 2 – Writing (2 hours – 30% of A level)

Answer two questions in French, one on a film and one on a book that you have studied in class.

Paper 3 – Speaking (16 – 18 mins plus preparation time – 30 % of A level)

2 sections

• Discussion based on a stimulus card (you have time before the test to prepare the card)
• Presentation and discussion of a topic you have prepared during the A level course

A little more…

The world is getting smaller and smaller as transport becomes ever faster and cheaper. The UK is leaving the European Union, but it is not leaving Europe! The need to communicate with other countries in their own language has never been greater.

What do our students do next?

Many of the students who study French at Shrewsbury High School continue their studies in French at university level, or combine French with other subjects.

A Level Results 2021

A*-A = 100%

Head of Modern Foreign Languages Faculty: Mrs Geraldine Irvine – g.irvine@shr.gdst.net

Exam Board: AQA

Further Mathematics

If you are an able mathematician, the workload in Further Mathematics will not be a problem.  Highlights include visiting Bletchley Park, entering the Senior Maths Challenge and representing the school at the UKMT Team Challenge, being involved in House Maths competitions, Maths Week, possibly being Maths prefect….and much more!

Special Entry Requirements: At least a grade 7 in Mathematics at GCSE, although we accept a grade 6 in some circumstances.

Course content and Assessment

Four 1.5 hour exams:

  • Further Pure Maths (Proof, Complex numbers, Matrices, Further Algebra and Functions, Further Calculus, Further Vectors)
  • Further Pure Maths 2 (Complex Numbers, Further Algebra and Functions, Further Calculus, Polar Coordinates, Hyperbolic Functions, Differential Equations)
  • Two optional papers: Further Statistics, and either Further Mechanics or Decision Maths (Maths of Business).

What do our students do next?
Last year, four of our students went on to study Mathematics at university.  Others have chosen to study a wide variety of subjects such as Architecture, Engineering, Geography and Chemistry.  Three students have gone to Oxbridge, many others to top Russell Group universities, one student is embarking on a degree apprenticeship in Engineering.

A Level Results 2021
A*-A = 67%

Head of Mathematics Faculty: Mrs Jacqueline Mills – j.mills@shr.gdst.net

Exam Board: AQA

Geography

Our A level is designed to excite students’ minds, challenge perceptions and stimulate their investigative and analytical skills.  The units we study reflect what’s happening in the world today, ranging from geopolitics to climate change, as well as allowing students to expand on more traditional topics such as coastal landscapes and the water cycle.  The course provides a smooth transition from GCSE to Advanced level.  A variety of fieldwork is integrated into the course, and the skills and knowledge students gain from this subject at A-level are relevant to almost all jobs and workplaces. Geographers are some of the most employable graduates, and the subject is seen as a ‘facilitating’ subject for the Russell Group universities.

Special Entry Requirements:  Minimum of grade 6 in Geography at GCSE or strong science grades.

For you?

Yes, if you enjoy both Physical and Human Geography. The course has an even balance of Science and Humanities, so is ideal if choosing to study a BA or BSc at university. A varied range of contemporary topics are studied, allowing you to build on your work from GCSE as well as learn brand new areas of Geography. You also have the opportunity to combine learning within the classroom with real world learning, as part of outdoor field studies.

Course content

Physical Geography
Section A: Water and Carbon Cycles – Water, carbon, climate and life on Earth
Section B: Coastal Systems and Landscapes – Processes, development and management in the coastal environment
Section C: Ecosystems Under Stress – Ecology and conservation in marine (coral reef), tropical rainforest and savanna biomes

Human Geography
Section A: Global Systems and Global Governance – Cultural, social, economic and environmental global connections and governance of the global commons
Section B: Changing Places – Relationships and connections with, and meaning and representation of, places at a local and distant scale
Section C: Contemporary Urban Environments – Social, economic, political and environmental sustainability in cities.

Geography Fieldwork Investigation
The Geography fieldwork investigation enables you to study an area of Geography you are passionate about, delving deeper into a topic of interest. There are also opportunities for you to develop a range of skills from Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and statistical tests to research and report writing.

Fieldwork
During the course, there are a variety of fieldwork opportunities.  We conduct hour-long analyses of our local area, including the Frankwell Flood Alleviation scheme, a local woodland ecosystem, globalisation of Pride Hill and perception and sustainability of Shrewsbury town centre.  We conduct fieldwork with the Field Studies Council at Preston Montford over 4 days, looking at urban and place studies for Human Geography and water, carbon and ecosystem studies for Physical Geography, as well as a coastal landscapes tour of the Welsh coast from Fairbourne to Harlech.  We also join the A-level Biologists for a two day marine biology and coastal ecology residential field course to
Aberystwyth.  Here we study both shoreline and sand dune ecology.

Assessment

Component 1: Physical Geography – Written Exam – 2 hours 30 minutes – 120 marks – 40% of A Level

Component 2: Human Geography – Written Exam – 2 hours 30 minutes – 120 marks – worth 40% of A Level

Component 3: Geography Fieldwork Investigation – 60 marks – worth 20% of A Level

Students complete an individual investigation which includes data collected in the field. The individual investigation is based on a question or issue defined and developed by the student relating to any part of the specification content so it can be tailored to area of their choosing. It should be 4,000 to 5,000 words and is marked by teachers and moderated by AQA.

What do our students do next?

We currently have students studying Geography at the University of Oxford, University of St Andrews and Durham University.  Students have also gone on to study Conservation, Zoology, and Agriculture at the Royal Agricultural College.  As Geography complements many other subjects, some students have chosen to study joint honours such as Geography and Biology at Durham University.  Geography students have also gone on to apprenticeships, such as the Trinity House Merchant Navy Scholarship Scheme and graduate apprenticeships with Airbus.  Alumna Bethany Watkins achieved a 1st class honours BSc in Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Science and is now a Tropical researcher and survey designer with ArcGIS skills.  She is also an ecological film maker, photographer and artist.

Recent highlights

Our students are starting a biweekly environmental newsletter to coincide with the UN Climate Change Conference (COP26) in November. We have new leadership roles as part of our Eco-Club and Eco-Committee with Eco-Captains being role models for sustainability for our whole school, and with Eco-Prefect’s leading the drive for sustainability within their house teams.

A-Level Results 2021

A*-A = 78%

A*-B = 100%

Head of Geography Department: Mrs Kimberley Anderson – k.anderson@shr.gdst.net

Exam Board: AQA

German

Learn German to A Level standard and equip yourself with the skills to be able to communicate with native speakers in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Northern Italy.  The importance of the German language is reflected in the fact that Germany is Europe’s dominant economy and the second largest exporting country in the world.  Indeed, the CBI rates German as one of the two most useful languages for job applicants.

Special Entry Requirements: At least grade 6 in German GCSE

For you?

If you enjoy communicating with others in small groups and finding out about how Germans view the world then you will enjoy A Level German.  You will find that you quickly develop confidence in spoken and written German and you will have the chance to express your views on anything and everything.  Understanding the society, culture and history of this fascinating part of Europe is a strong feature of the course.

Course content

Two themes are prescribed by AQA for the course:

• Social issues and trends – the changing state of the family, the digital world, youth culture: fashion and trends, music, television, immigration, integration and racism.
• Political, intellectual and artistic culture – festivals and traditions, art and architecture, cultural life in Berlin, past and present, Germany and the European Union, politics and youth, German re-unification and its consequences.

You will also study a film and a work of literature.

Assessment

There are three exams for A level German

Paper 1 – Listening, Reading and Writing (2 hours 30 minutes – 40% of A level grade)

4 sections:  Listening Comprehension, Reading Comprehension,  Translation into English and  Translation into German

Paper 2 – Writing (2 hours – 30% of A level)

Answer two questions in German, one on a film and one on a book that you have studied in class.

Paper 3 – Speaking (16 – 18 mins plus preparation time – 30 % of A level)

2 sections:  Discussion based on a stimulus card (you have time before the test to prepare the card) and a presentation and discussion of a topic you have prepared during the A level course.  You take the speaking test with your teacher in school.

A little more…

Many of the students who study German at Shrewsbury High School continue their studies in German at university level, or combine German with other subjects.  One student from last year’s leavers went on to spend a year working in Germany before she takes up her place at university.

A Level Results 2021

A*-A = 100%

Head of Modern Foreign Languages Faculty:  Mrs Geraldine Irvine – g.irvine@shr.gdst.net

Exam Board: AQA

History

History is primarily about real people and their stories.  You will learn to analyse, debate and argue your case.  Employers who see that have a qualification in History know that you have acquired a variety of skills that can be applied to all sorts of situations from law to journalism.

Special Entry Requirements: A grade 6 at GCSE is usually the minimum requirement, however it is not essential for you to have studied GCSE History and so a grade 6 in English Language or English Literature or another humanities subject will also be accepted.

For you?

You cannot fail to find this fascinating subject both interesting and very useful as History is primarily about people and trying to understand what motivated them. The subject involves intellectual challenge and rigour: you will be asked to question, explore and study different historians’ interpretations of the past.

Course content

Papers 1 & 2 will be studied throughout the two years of the A Level. The Historical Investigation will be carried out towards of the end of Year 12 and at the start of Year 13.

Paper 1: Breadth Study – The Tudors: England 1485 – 1603

This paper involves a study of Tudor England – one of the most celebrated periods of English history involving such monarchs as Henry VIII and Elizabeth I as well as English society in the 16th Century.  It is a breadth study of over 100 years and so allows for students to follow and analyse significant historical developments and associated controversies over a prolonged period of time.

Topics to be studied include: how effectively did the Tudors restore the powers of the monarchy; how skillfully was England governed during this period; how did relations with Spain & France change; and how did English society and economy develop and with what effects?

Assessment: This will be assessed by a 2.5 hour written paper and is worth 40% of the A-level.

Paper 2: Depth Study – Democracy and Nazism: Germany 1918 – 1945

This paper involves a study of one of the darkest periods in history as it examines why Germany saw the takeover of its government by Hitler and the Nazi Party and the changes they brought about to German society. With a shorter time frame, it is a depth study of a major historical development and involves particular use of primary evidence and sources.

Topics to be studied include: what were the attempts to establish German democracy after World War One; how did Hitler rise to power; what was Nazi terror state like and why was opposition to it ineffective; and what was the impact of World War Two upon Germany, including the Holocaust.

Assessment: This will be assessed by a 2.5 hour written paper and is worth 40% of the A-level.

Historical Investigation

This is a 3,500 – 4,500 word personal study based on a question of the student’s own choice and is worth 20% of the A-level. Although supported by the History Department, this is a chance for students to demonstrate their intellectual curiosity as well as their ability to independently organize and write an academic paper.

a little more…

Through the study of History you will deepen and broaden your understanding of the wider world and help you to understand society today. As Samuel Taylor Coleridge stated: ‘If people could learn history, what lessons it might teach us!’ You can find further information on this subject on the Historical Association website: www.history.org.uk

What do our students do next?

One of recent 2021 leavers went on to study History and English joint honours at the University of Edinburgh and another went on to study Politics and International Relations at University College London.

A Level Results 2021

A*/A = 75%

A*-B = 100%

Head of Humanities Faculty and Department: Miss Emma Davies – e.davies@shr.gdst.net

Exam Board: AQA

Latin

Latin is multi-disciplinary, combining language, history, philosophy and literature: something for almost everybody.  It complements both Arts and Science subjects and impresses employers and universities alike as it teaches you to think logically and solve complicated problems.

Special Entry Requirements:  We normally expect A Level students to have gained at least a 6 in Latin at GCSE / Level 2, although higher grades will ensure candidates are able to embark more confidently on the Latin Course.

For you?

Yes, provided you are prepared to work hard, think through complex sentence structures, and be open to appreciation of literature from a different culture. Pupils who have studied Latin have enjoyed the experience and we find that they become hooked on the similar problems that come up in the literature; it is heartening and dispiriting in equal measure to find that humanity has moved on very little, but studying the speeches of Cicero teaches us all that constructing a good argument is a key skill in today’s world, and the wonderful poetry of Virgil can move even the most cynical eighteen year old to tears.

If you are interested in the world around you, you will thoroughly enjoy A Level Latin.  Latin will challenge you, but will improve your thinking skills, your problem-solving abilities and your analytical powers by introducing you to some of the most influential literature known.

Course content:

Most of the grammar in the A Level course has already been covered in GCSE/Level 2 so this is time for consolidation and refining your translation technique.  The literature will consist of two authors, one prose and one verse, which are studied in terms of their literary style as well as their historical context.  We usually choose to study a speech by Cicero and a book of Virgil taken from the Aeneid.  These are two of the foremost figures in Roman politics and literature and you will find that their influence stretches in other subjects such as English, History, and Politics.

Assessment:

Assessment is by examination at the end of two years and is externally assessed.  You will be sitting four examinations:

  1. Unseen Translation: 105 mins.
    You will be asked to translate a short passage of Livy that you have not seen before and a short passage of Ovid.  During the course you will have had the chance to translate the work of several authors but you will concentrate on the two set for the examination so that you are familiar with their style and subject matter.
  2. Prose Composition or Comprehension: 75 mins.
    This paper gives you the choice of a passage of Latin prose or a piece of English to put into Latin.  We are happy to do either depending on the candidates, but we usually advise candidates to opt for the comprehension which asks you questions on content and style as well as some grammatical analysis.  These are the kind of things you will have been asked throughout your study of Latin so should not cause any great problem.  Prose Composition is an acquired skill which should not be attempted without practice.
  3. Prose Literature: 120 mins.
    In the prose paper, you will be given four passages from the prose author (Cicero) you have studied during the course and be asked to translate a few lines as well as answer questions on content and style.  There will be two 15 mark essays which delve deeper into your understanding of Cicero’s literary or oratorical style and there is one 20 mark essay which has a broader scope and expects you to refer to passages of the speech which was in English as well as those in Latin.
  4. Verse Literature: 120 mins
    The verse paper is the same in form as the prose, giving you four passages from the Latin text you have studied with content and style questions and a commentary on a longer passage as the 15 mark essay.  There will also be a 20 mark essay covering the wider themes and the English sections that you are expected to have read.

A little more…

The classical world gives us an enjoyable and valuable experience of language and literature, and is the basis of modern society. Its study forces us to look at ourselves from a different angle, helping us to develop communication skills, independence of thought, self-awareness and an understanding of human nature.  Our politics, laws, literature, arts, religion and much more, all start with the classical world.

For those pupils who excel at Latin and who have the commitment, we are able to offer Classical Greek at both GCSE and A Level.

What can I do with Latin?

What can’t you do?  We have had a wide variety of Latin students over the years ranging from those who just can’t get enough of the ancient world and who go on to study it to doctorate level, as well as those who went into medicine, journalism, publishing, teaching, and acting.  We have also had several former pupils who are now engineers, accountants and solicitors.  Latin is not a narrow, dusty subject, it produces people who are forward looking and keen to excel in their sphere.

Some Notable Successes

One of our former Latin pupils is now a senior drilling engineer with BP, we have at least four doctors, and two girls who have recently been awarded firsts in Classics from Cambridge, St Andrew’s and Durham.

A Level Results 2021

A* – B = 100%

Head of Department:  Mrs Di Birt – d.birt@shr.gdst.net

Exam Board: AQA

Mathematics

Do you enjoy Mathematics? Can you factorise a quadratic and actually enjoy the process? Are you expecting a good grade at GCSE? If the answer to each of these questions is YES then you should seriously consider taking Mathematics at A level. A recent article in the Times Educational Supplement stated that having Mathematics at A Level increases long term earning power by 7-10 % and it will most certainly help your job prospects in virtually any field.

Special Entry Requirements:  At least a grade 7 in Mathematics at GCSE, although we accept a grade 6 in some circumstances.

For you?

You will need to organise your study time as it is essential for you to practise the new techniques that you will learn after each session by completing the necessary homework.

Course Content and Assessment

You will study three modules:

Pure Mathematics 1: Proof, algebra and functions, coordinate geometry, sequences and series, trigonometry, exponentials and logarithms, differentiation, integration, vectors.

Pure Mathematics 2: Proof, algebra and functions, coordinate geometry, sequences and series, trigonometry, differentiation, integration, numerical methods.

Statistics & Mechanics: Statistical sampling, data presentation and interpretation, probability, statistical distributions, statistical hypothesis testing, quantities and units in mechanics, kinematics, forces and Newton’s Laws, moments.

Each module is tested by a 2 hour exam at the end of the course & they have equal weighting.

There is no coursework element.

A little more…

A Level Mathematics is highly regarded and will certainly aid university applications for a variety of subjects such as Engineering.

Highlighs include visiting Bletchley Park, entering the Senior Maths Challenge and representing the school at the UKMT Team Challenge, being involved in House Maths competitions, Maths Week, possibly being Maths Prefect….and much more!

What do our students do next?

Last year, four of our students went on to study Mathematics at university.  Others have chosen to study a wide variety of subjects such as Architecture, Engineering, Geography and Chemistry.  Three students have gone to Oxbridge, many others to top Russell Group universities, one student is embarking on a degree apprenticeship in Engineering.

A Level Results 2021

A*-B = 89%

Head of Mathematics Faculty:  Mrs Jacqueline Mills – j.mills@shr.gdst.net

Exam Board: Edexcel

Music

The study of music will add a new dimension to your life and give you pleasure and satisfaction for many years to come. The analytical course content and discipline of practical study ensures that music is well respected at A Level alongside sciences, maths, arts, languages or humanities and supports a wide range of career choices.

Special Entry Requirements: GCSE Music at least grade 6, and ABRSM minimum grade 5.  Basic piano/keyboard skills are extremely useful.

For you?

Absolutely, if you are a practical musician, who enjoys the intellectual and rewarding challenge of unlocking features of style through performing, wide listening, analysis, score reading and composing.

Course Content and Assessment:

Performing – 35% Coursework:

A minimum of 10 minutes of performance in total is required.  This can be one or more pieces and can be solo or ensemble repertoire, or a mixture of both.  Candidates can also combine vocal performance with instrumental, if they wish.  This component of the course will be usually recorded in the first week of March in Year 13 and will be externally marked by AQA examiners.

Composing – 25% Coursework:

Two compositions with a total playing time of at least four and a half minutes; one free choice composition and one composition in response to a brief set by AQA on 1st September in Year 13.

Appraising – 40% 2.5 Hour Examination:

Students study the Western Classical Tradition as a compulsory area of study.  This is subdivided into three areas of fantastic music:

  • Baroque: the solo concerto
  • Romantic: the piano music of Chopin, Brahms and Grieg
  • Classical: the operas of Mozart

Listening – unfamiliar music

You must be able to listen attentively to unfamiliar music from each of the three strands to identify and accurately describe musical elements and use musical language (including staff notation).

Analysis and contextual understanding – set works.  For two of the selected strands, you must also be able to critically appraise music through analysing excerpts from the set works using knowledge and understanding of:

  • The effect of audience, time and place on how the set works were created, developed and performed.
  • How and why the music across the selected strand is different.
  • Relevant musical vocabulary and terminology for the set works.
  • How the composer’s purpose and intention for the set works is reflected in their use of musical elements.
  • The complex interdependencies between musical elements.
  • The sophisticated connections between music and its context.

A little more…

Music students play a pivotal role in the life of the school, directing musical activities and leading orchestras and choirs in school and community.  To support your studies, you are advised to take advantages of all opportunities to perform, and to attend concerts and professional performances of live music wherever possible.  It is expected that A Level musicians will be involved in at least two different musical groups.  Our students have progressed to top university music departments and conservatoires.  In recent years we have performed a Mozart Opera with a professional Opera company and we have performed at the Three Choirs Festival with the internationally acclaimed Gabrieli Consort.

A Level Results 2021

A* = 100%

Director of Music:  Mr Chris Bunn – c.bunn@shr.gdst.net

Exam Board: AQA

Physical Education

You can utilise a wide range of opportunities to gain experience and develop an interest in a variety of roles in sport such as a performer or coach. It does not stop there, theoretically it also means a commitment to reading related articles and not just the text books used.

Special Entry Requirements: GCSE PE is not a necessity.  Practically, students should by playing regularly for school or club teams in a sport (s).

For you?

Yes, as long as you get fully involved within the PE Department and the clubs available. This will enhance your enjoyment of the course as you fully immerse yourself with the younger years’ sports and clubs. You must be prepared to participate in class discussions sharing your ideas and opinions.

Course Content:

At A level you will be studying applied anatomy and physiology, skill acquisition, sport and society, exercise physiology and biomechanics, sports psychology, sport and society and technology in sport.  You will also be assessed as a player/performer or coach in a full-sided version of one activity and carry out a written/verbal analysis and evaluation of performance.

Assessment:

Paper 1: Factors affecting participation in physical activity and sport

2 hour written exam – 105 marks – 35% of A-level

  • Section A: Applied anatomy and physiology
  • Section B: Skill acquisition
  • Section C: Sport and society

Paper 2: Factors affecting optimal performance in physical activity and sport

2 hour written exam – 105 marks – 35% of A-level

  • Section A: Exercise physiology and biomechanics
  • Section B: Sport psychology
  • Section C: Sport and society and technology in sport

Non-exam assessment: Practical performance in physical activity and sport

Internal assessment, external moderation: 90 marks – 30% of A-level

Students assessed as a performer or coach in the full sided version of one activity, plus a written/verbal analysis of performance.

A little more…

The co-curricular programme within PE has many different clubs and opportunities for you to get involved in, for example, officiating and/or coaching the younger years. We encourage your involvement in these clubs allowing you to enhance your skills.

For our national sports performers, we run a very successful Elite Athlete Programme to support students in balancing their academic, sporting and home lives.  We compete in all the GDST sports rallies and county events and have held the Oddfellows Shield for being the best performing netball school in Shropshire for the last 18 out of 19 years.

What do our students do next?

Our students have gone on to study a wide range of courses.
For example:

  • Biochemistry at Cardiff University
  • Geography at Manchester University
  • Food Marketing and Business at Reading University
  • Psychology at Sheffield University
  • PE & Sport Coaching at Birmingham University
  • Politics at Exeter University
  • Law at Cardiff University

A Level Results 2021

A*/A = 67%

Director of Sport:  Mrs Sian Fenner – s.fenner@shr.gdst.net

Exam Board: AQA

Physics

By studying A Level Physics you will develop your experimental and analytical skills, learn how to communicate your thoughts in a scientific way both orally and in different types of written presentation and be able to appreciate the way in which Physics principles can be applied to the way in which many aspects of the world work.

Special Entry Requirements:  At least a grade 6 in Physics and a grade 6 in Mathematics at GCSE.  We would also suggest you consider the study of maths.

For you?

Yes, if you are someone who likes to learn by experimentation and to understand why things happen the way they do.  Physicists ask the questions “why?” and “how?” a lot.  Why is the Universe the way it is?  How does my digital camera capture, store and retrieve images?

You need to be prepared to accept new ideas, utilise your maths skills, stretch your powers of understanding and enjoy the moment when concept becomes clear and you comprehend something new. There will be plenty to do too. Practical work will enable you to learn new skills and to put the theory into practice.

Course Content:

YEAR 1: In Year 12 you will cover work on forces and motion, waves, material properties, electricity, quantum physics, and experimental skills.  This picks up work already familiar to you from GCSE and takes it further.  The section on quantum theory deals with new concepts.

YEAR 2: In Year 13 you will cover work on magnetic, electric and gravitational fields. cosmology and start life cycles, radioactivity and medical imaging.

Assessment:

Three written papers

Paper 1:  2 hours 15 minutes, worth 37% of the A level and containing structured questions and multiple choice questions.

Paper 2:  2 hour 15 minutes, worth 37% of the A Level and containing structured questions and multiple choice questions.

Paper 3:  1 hour 30 minutes, worth 26% of the A Level and containing structured questions, with a focus on the assessment of theory and practical skills within practical contexts.

Practical Skills: You will complete a minimum of 12 practical activities to demonstrate practical competence.  Performance will be reported separately to the A level grade.

A little more…

To study Physics at University you need Maths A level.

A Level Results 2021

A*/A = 100%

Head of Physics Department: Mr Tony Pyle – t.pyle@shr.gdst.net

Exam Board:  OCR (Specification A)

Politics

Studying A Level Politics gives you the confidence and ability to not only discuss current affairs but actually understand them.  It is a well respected academic subject, combining well with both science and arts A Levels.

Politics is part of the PPE course at Oxford University, which is famous for producing Prime Ministers and world leaders including David Cameron and Ed Miliband.  Ultimately, Politics A-Level helps you to develop debating skills as well as a knowledge and appreciation of the world around you, giving you an advantage at university interviews and putting you in good stead for the rest of your life.

Special Entry Requirements: Politics is a subject only offered at A Level and therefore there are no GCSE requirements.

For you?

If you enjoy debating, questioning, arguing and have a real interest in the world around you, then consider Politics.  As the second year involves the study of US politics, an interest in American life and culture would be a real advantage.

Course Content and Assessment

Paper 1: UK Politics – 2 hour examination, work 33% of A Level

Students will study democracy and participation, political parties, electoral systems, voting behaviour and the media.  This paper will also include core political ideas of conservatism, liberalism and socialism.

Paper 2: UK Government– 2 hour examination, work 33% of A Level

Students will study the institutions and organisations of the UK such as the constitution, Parliament, the Prime Minister and executive, and ultimately the question is asked:  Where does the power lie within in the UK?

Paper 3: Comparative Politics – US Government and Politics – 2 hour examination, work 33% of A Level

A comparative unit will see students looking at the US Constitution and federalism, US Congress, the US Presidency, US Supreme Court, democracy and participation, civil rights.

There is no coursework element.

What our students do next

One of our recent 2021 leavers went on to study Politics at the University of Exeter.

A Level Results 2021

A*/A = 100%

Head of Humanities Faculty and Department: Miss Emma Davies – e.davies@shr.gdst.net

Exam Board: AQA

Psychology

Psychology is the scientific study of all aspects of the mind and human behaviour (and some animal behaviour), from how we grow and learn to old age and forgetting and everything in between.  You will find Psychology is relevant to all human experience and psychologists work in hospitals, schools, industry, advertising, police service, armed services, the media and the world of sport to name a few.  Everyone in adult life can benefit from studying it as we are always interacting with others.

Special Entry Requirements:  A good standard of English Language, Science and Mathematics is essential (grade 6 or above).  There is a biological content to many of the psychological topics covered and basis statistics are utilised to assess the validity of psychological research.

For you?

It is a very stimulating course but you need to come prepared to work hard, contribution in lessons and above all, come with an open mind; human behaviour is very complex. It is not like any subject you will have ever studied before, however, it is interesting and relevant to all aspects of everyday life.

Course Content:

There are three, 2 hour examination papers, all at the end of the two year course in May/June.  All topics are compulsory and all exams have the following format:

  • Multiple choice – where you demonstrate your knowledge and understanding.
  • Short answer – where you demonstrate your knowledge and understanding.
  • Extended writing – where you demonstrate your ability to construct and develop a line of reasoning that is coherent, relevant, logical and based upon knowledge.

Paper 1 (33.3%) – Introductory topics in psychology

  • Social Influence
  • Memory
  • Attachment
  • Psychopathology (OCD, phobias, depression)

Paper 2 (33.3%) – Psychology in context

  • Approaches in Psychology
  • Biopsychology
  • Research Methods

Paper 3 (33.3%) – issues and options in Psychology

  • Issues and debates in Psychology
  • Relationship
  • Stress
  • Addiction

A little more…

There is no typical combination of subjects to go with Psychology.  We have girls with every other A level option possible studying it.  One of the reasons Psychology is so popular is that it opens many career doors, for example, Forensic, Clinical, Sports & Educational Psychology. Many professions recognise the unique blend of science, arts and fact, and evaluation that is Psychology: including Law, Medicine, Occupational Therapy, Physiotherapy, Journalism, Advertising.  The list is endless because all careers involve people and it helps to understand human behaviour.

What do our students do next?

This is a very popular A level subject. Every year we have several students who go on to study psychology or psychology related subjects at university. It has also been a popular choice with medics and sports science students.

Top 10 careers in Psychology

  • Psychotherapists – Help people to overcome a variety of different psychological and emotional issues.
  • Forensic Psychologists – Perform a variety of roles throughout the judicial and penal systems, from assessing offenders to informing institutional policy.
  • Sports Psychologists – Study the psychological factors that affect participants’ performance during sport, advising athletes on how they can enhance their performance.
  • Educational Psychologists – Assess the needs of children who are experiencing behavioural and learning difficulties at school, and recommend appropriate treatment.
  • Social Researchers – Conduct research into areas such as crime, unemployment and migration, the results of which are used to assess the effectiveness of existing policy or to inform the creation of new policies.
  • Advertising Account Executives – Research, plan and create advertising campaigns in a variety of different media to promote a range of products and services.
  • Public Relations Officers – Manage client reputations through a variety of media communications, including press releases, social media and public events.
  • Recruitment Consultants – Help to meet the recruitment needs for a range of companies by advertising vacancies, researching the suitability of applicants and putting forward candidates for interview.
  • Human Factors Psychologists – Study the way humans interact with the world around them, applying the principles of psychology to enhance product design and work environments, e.g the Human Factors Psychologist at google works on creating new fonts to make the online experience more enjoyable.
  • Market Researchers – Collect and analyse data which is used by companies to help them better tailor their products and services to their customers’ needs.

A Level Results 2021

A*/A = 60%

Head of Psychology:  Mrs Victoria McQueen – v.mcqueen@shr.gdst.net

Exam Board: AQA

Religious Studies

Religious Studies A level will help you to develop and explore key skills for academic study in a variety of disciplines at university level. You will have the opportunity to hone skills such as critical thinking and analysis, develop your confidence in expressing your own views whilst challenging others in a considered manner.

Special Entry Requirements:  You do not have to have studied GCSE Religious Studies to take this course.  A grade 6 in English Language, English Literature or another Humanities subject will be accepted.

For you?

If you like discussing and arguing about the big questions of life, looking for a course that is rigorous, challenging, academic and will make you think and if you are open to exploring your own beliefs and assumptions, then RS is for you.

The big questions in life such as “Does God exist? Why am I here? Why is there evil and suffering in the world? Can miracles really happen?” are considered, and linked to the theologians and philosophers who shaped the debates of their time.

Course Content:

Candidates will study three units of work in each year, each assessed by a 2 hour examination worth 33% of the overall grade.

We will be covering:

  • Philosophy of Religion – covering arguments relating to God’s existence, the problem of evil and suffering and the nature of religious experiences.  In Year 13 this will develop further to include a study of Religious Language, Philosophers and developments through time.
  • Ethics and Religion – key theories in ethics related to real life issues such as Sexual Ethics and War and Peace.  In Year 13 this will move further into the study of medical ethics and ethical language.
  • Textual Studies – exploring the historical, religious and social context of the life of Jesus.  Considering how we interpret scripture.  In year 13 this moves into a study of the scientific and historical challenges to the New Testament through faith and history.

There is no coursework element

A little more…

Religious Studies is an academically rigorous course which will provide you with a platform to explore a range of beliefs and concepts.  No assumptions are made about individual faith; and a personal religious commitment is not necessary for a full understanding and enjoyment of the course.  Religious Studies is a challenging and rewarding academic discipline which is widely respected by universities, and can lead to a wide range of careers from law, journalism, social administration, banking, and teaching, to name but a few.

What do our students do next?

Many of the Shrewsbury High Sixth form students go on to study Philosophy, Ethical Studies or PPE at university.

A Level Results 2021

A*/A = 69%

A* – B = 100%

Head of Religion, Philosophy and Ethics: Mrs Carla Tonks – c.tonks@shr.gdst.net

Exam Board: Edexcel

Spanish

Spanish is the second most widely spoken language in the world and studying the language for A Level will open up countless career and travel opportunities, not only in Spain but in the vast majority of countries in South and Central America.  More and more organisations and businesses are recruiting people who know Spanish as it is spoken so widely.  You might choose to study Spanish at university, and could combine it with another subject such as law, economics or international relations.

Special Entry Requirements: at least a grade 6 in Spanish at GCSE level.

For you?

During the A Level course you will build on GCSE language and grammar to reach a high standard of spoken and written Spanish.  In addition to improving language skills you will learn more about the society, culture and history of Spain and Spanish speaking countries.

You will learn how to put your language to practical use by reading Spanish newspapers, magazines, websites and literature, watching Spanish films and news items and listening to Spanish radio programmes.  The lessons focus on participation, putting the theory of language into practice.

Course Content:

Two themes are prescribed by AQA for the course:

  • Social issues and trends – modern and traditional values, cyberspace, equal rights, immigration, racism and integration.
  • Political, intellectual and artistic culture – modern day idols, Spanish regional identity, cultural heritage, today’s youth, tomorrow’s citizens, monarchies and dictatorships and popular movements.

You will also study a film and a play.

Assessment:

There are three exams for A level Spanish.

Paper 1 – Listening, Reading and Writing (2 hours 30 minutes – 40% of A level grade)

  • Listening comprehension (you have your own MP3 player and can control the playback of the recording)
  • Reading comprehension
  • Translation into English
  • Translation into Spanish

Paper 2 – Writing (2 hours – 30% of A level)

Answer two questions in Spanish, one on a film and one on the play that you have studied in class.

Paper 3 – Speaking (16 – 18 mins plus preparation time – 30 % of A level)

  • Discussion based on a stimulus card (you have time before the test to prepare the card)
  • Presentation and discussion of a topic you have prepared during the A level course
  • You take the speaking test with your teacher in school.

A little more…

In addition to the lessons, you will have a weekly conversation class with the Spanish assistant in a small group. This will help you to become more fluent and confident when speaking Spanish.  You will also be encouraged to read and listen to Spanish outside the classroom.  We hope that you will also take the opportunity to visit Spain at some point during the course, and perhaps do some work experience there.

What do our students do next?

Many of the students who study Spanish at Shrewsbury High School continue their studies in Spanish at university level, or combine Spanish with other subjects.  In recent years we have had A Level students take up places at such prestigious universities as Cambridge, Durham and Edinburgh to study a language.

A Level Results 2021

A*/A = 100%

Head of Modern Foreign Languages Faculty:  Mrs Geraldine Irvine – g.irvine@shr.gdst.net

Exam Board: AQA

Tech Level IT: Application Design

Computers are widely used in all aspects of business, industry, government, education, leisure and the home. In this increasingly technological age, a study of computer science, and particularly how computers are used in the solution of a variety of problems, is not only valuable to the learners themselves but also essential to the future well-being of the country. 

This pathway focuses on the development of a range of applications across platforms and sectors.  Students will gain the right combination of knowledge, understanding and skills required for the 21st century, enabling them to demonstrate the skills of writing specifications, and the design, build, testing and implementation of applications.

Special Entry Requirements: There are no special subject requirements but you should be comfortable with working independently to strict deadlines.

For you?

There are four good reasons to study Computer Science:
1. The digital age needs Digitally literate people
Like it or not, you’re living in it – this is the Digital Age. Computer programmes have all but infiltrated every aspect of our lives.  Computer scientists theorise, design, develop and apply the software and hardware for the programmes we use day in day out – sounds pretty important to us.
2. IT students have excellent graduate prospects
The employability skills taught as part of the T-Level IT qualification provide students with a head start in their careers.  Critical thinking, collaboration, and analytical skills form a core strand of the assessment model and this can help lead to excellent graduate prospects.
3. Excellent career prospects
Digitally literate students are in demand and their salaries reflects this. Recent graduates in professional roles earn quite a lot on average – Computer Science related graduates earn above the average UK wage!
4. Access to a wide range of industries
Every industry uses computers so naturally computer scientists can work in any. Problems in science, engineering, health care, and so many other areas can be solved by computers. It’s up to the computer scientist to figure out how, and design the software to apply the solution.

Course Content:

Unit 1 Fundamentals of IT: A sound understanding of IT technologies and practices is essential for IT professionals.  Information learnt in this unit will create a solid foundation in the fundamentals of hardware, networks, software, the ethical use of computers and how businesses use IT.
Unit 2 Global Information: The purpose of this unit is to demonstrate the uses of information in the public domain, globally, in the cloud and across the Internet, by individuals and organisations. Your students will discover that good management of both data and information is essential and that it can give any organisation a competitive edge.
Unit 6 Application Design: The world is increasingly reliant on applications that help individuals, business and organisations achieve specific activities or purposes.  In this unit your students will explore potential ideas for a new application and develop the fundamental design for it.  They will then develop the designs for an application and how users will interact with it.  The application that students will design could be for any sector and for any purpose.  They will have the opportunity to present their ideas, prototype them and gain feedback before refining their design.
Unit 8 Project Management: The key to any project being a success is the planning and management that takes place.  Project management skills are essential transferable skills that can be used for all projects whether it’s traditional methodologies or more recently adopted agile approaches within the IT development environment.  These skills can be adapted and used even on the smallest ‘tasks’ during the planning and implementation stages.
Unit 13 Social Media and Digital Marketing: This unit looks at digital marketing as a concept and then offers your students the opportunity to explore the possible impacts, both positive and negative, that may be generated using social media as a digital marketing tool.
Unit 14 Software Engineering for business: This unit focuses on developing code for a single customer with specific requirements. If you are on the application developer pathway, you could follow this unit with the games design and prototyping unit, which focuses on developing for a mass market, allowing you to further develop your coding skills and experience.

Assessment:

Component 1: Fundamentals of IT – Written exam 1.5 hours – 80 marks, worth 25%

Component 2: Global Information – Written exam 1.5 hours – 80 marks, worth 25%

Non-Examined Assessments – Marked by your teacher and moderated by OCR – 70 marks, worth 20%

A Little more…..

Common destinations for Computer Science students include:
Degrees in Computer Science related subjects: Computer Science | Networking | Software Development | Business Analysis |Systems Engineering | Cyber Security
Work placed destinations include roles such as: Web Developer | Mobile Application Developer | Systems Engineers | Business Analysts | IT Managers | Systems Architects | Machine Learning Engineers | Computer Games Designers |Network Architects | Cyber Security Specialists | Forensic Criminologists

What do our Students do next?

A number of our recent 2020 leavers have gone on to study related subjects at university or into degree level apprenticeships with companies such as Dyson.

Past T Level Results:

A*/A = 100%

Head of Department:  Mr Andy Petford – a.petford@shr.gdst.net

Exam Board: OCR – Cambridge Technical Level 2 in IT: Application Development Pathway

Textiles

In the Art department we offer Fine Art, Textile Design and Photography as separate A Levels.  The aim of the Textile Design course is to enable our students to learn how to develop and produce personal, creative work within an art and design context, across a broad range of creative disciplines. Furthermore, the course aims to enable students to analyse their own visual work as well as evaluate and learn from work by other artists, designers and crafts people.

Special Entry Requirements:  A grade 6 or above at GCSE.  Exceptions may be made in particular circumstances.

For you?

Yes, provided you embrace the experimentation of media and progression from GCSE.  A Level textiles is a fine-art based textiles course, aimed at developing skills, techniques and creativity in textiles.  The aim of the course is is to develop an ambitious and creative portfolio underpinned by solid skills, techniques and knowledge of textiles.  A thoughtful and creative approach to ideas is encouraged and students learn strong technical skills and a wide vocabulary of visual language.

Course Content:

Textile Design is a versatile discipline that involves the creation, selection, manipulation and application of a range of materials and processes in order to produce fabrics for different purposes.  Textile designers are expected to work in a multi-disciplinary way to create ideas, concepts, materials and techniques for different applications.

Assessment:

1 x Coursework Portfolio and 1 x examination unit.

Coursework:

A level pupils are encouraged to experiment with numerous techniques and processes around the ‘Formal Elements of Art’ but connected to a theme.  In the autumn and spring terms, organised Life Drawing sessions can complement work carried out in the studio.  Professional textile artists are invited into the department to offer workshops in different areas of the subject.

A little more…

Art trips/workshops every year help to inform both the coursework and examination elements of the subject.  Recent visits have been made to Paris, London, Manchester, Liverpool and Birmingham Art Galleries/Museums.  A New York trip is on the horizon!  A recent textile workshop run by the artist Clare Linford produced some lovely ‘Davore’ work.  The year 13 Textile students have their own studio space within the art department.

What do our Students do next?

Recent A Level artists have gone on to study degrees/MSs such as Architecture at Cambridge University, Graphic Design at Manchester University, Fine  Art at Lancaster and Aberystwyth University, Art History at UCL and Fo9undation Diplomas in Art and Design at Hereford College of Art.

Recent Highlights:

Every year, Shr4ewsbury High School enters student textile work into the Drapers Textile Competition.  The Young Textile Design Competition is seen as a starting point from which to develop young talent and extend future opportunities.  It is also an opportunity for students considering a career in textiles to display their work through the exhibition.  This year, six SHS students entered their work into the competition with one of our students winning Gold.

Head of Arts and Creative Technologies Faculty: Mr James Millichamp – j.millichamp@shr.gdst.net

Exam Board: Edexcel

To download the full Sixth Form Options Guide for 2023-5, please click here: Sixth Form Option Guide 2023

Our students also have the opportunity of studying for the Extended Project Qualification.

Shrewsbury


Why Girls-Only?
An evening with Dr Kevin Stannard.
Wednesday 29th November

 

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